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Giving Dogs A New Leash On Life...One Click At A Time

Today is: Wednesday January 17, 2018


First Aid for your Dog

Most people and their dogs go through their lives from day to day and don't give much thought on what to do when an emergency arises. We tend to take their health for granted. We panic when a situation does come up. We hope to be able to provide you with some basic advice and first aid tips for you to help stabilize your dog until he can get the proper medical attention that he needs. If an emergency situation does arise, PLEASE get your dog to the veterinarian as soon as possible. Sometimes it is a matter of life and death!

It is also recommended that you have a pet first aid kit on hand, both in your house and in your car. You can either buy a ready made kit or make your own, check here to see what you should put in your first aid kit.

Also, it is highly advisable to know what signs to look for to tell if your dog is sick. You can see a brief list of things to look for here.

Physical Trauma, Getting Hit By A Car, Etc.

  • Carefully muzzle your dog. If you do not have a muzzle available, you may use a bandage or sock or something similar to wrap around his mouth. Knot it around his lower jaw, once, and then behind his neck.

  • Carefully place your dog onto a blanket, a towel, or something else that can be used as a stretcher. And move him to a safe location. Gently lie the stretcher on a flat, steady surface.

  • Do not handle any fractured limbs or the head/neck.

  • Take your dog to the veterinarian right away. Even though he may look alright, you have no idea what type of internal injuries he may have sustained.

Bleeding/Open Wounds

  • Carefully muzzle your dog.

  • Apply a clean piece of gauze over the wound with firm pressure.

  • If the wound slows down, keep the wound clean and dry. Do not keep it covered.

  • If the wound continues to bleed for a few minutes and is not slowing down, keep firm pressure on it and get him to the veterinarian as soon as possible.

Bite Wounds

Breathing Difficulties

  • Keep your dog in a horizontal position. Carefully check to see if there is any visible obstructions, by pulling his tongue forward, extending his neck, and fully opening his mouth. If you can see something, try to remove it with your finger. If you can not see something perform 5-10 abdominal trusts. If this does not help, CALL the vet immediately.

  • To help him breath, extend his neck, hold his tongue out of his mouth, and close his jaws over his tongue. Blow air through his nose, giving 12-20 breaths. If there is no response, you should start cardiac compressions.

  • For cardiac compressions, dogs under 15 pounds keep him lying on his back, for bigger dogs keep him on his side. Gently compress chest wall with one or two hands placed on the widest part of his sternum. Depress rib cage 1.5 to 3 inches. Follow the guideline below for how many times per minute for the proper weight of your dog.

5-24 pounds

180-140 times per minute

25-59 pounds

80-100 times per minute

60 pounds and over

60 times per minute

  • Continue with cpr following the guidelines below

5-24 pounds

30 times per minute

25-59 pounds

16-20 times per minute

60 pounds and over

12 times per minute

BOTH CPR AND CARDIAC COMPRESSIONS ARE SKILLS THAT NEED TO BE LEARNED HOW TO DO THEM PROPERLY.  CONSULT YOUR VET FOR CLASSES IN YOUR AREA ON THE PROPER TECHNIQUES.  IF DONE INCORRECTLY YOU MAY DO MORE HARM THAN GOOD!!!

Vomiting

  • If your dog vomits once or twice throughout one day, hold off on feeding him for the rest of the day.

  • Offer him only small amounts of water at a time.

  • Give him small portions of food the next day.

  • If the vomiting is more frequent, brings up blood, or is more severe, get him to the vet as soon as possible.

Exposure to Extreme Heat or Cold

Extreme Heat Exposure:

  • If prolonged exposure to heat, heat stroke starts to develop.  The major signs of heat stroke are:
          - Panting
          - Increased Pulse
          - Bright Red gums
          - High body temperature 
             (105-110 degrees F)

  • Take your dog out of the heat and get him to a cool, shady area.

  • Offer him cold water to drink.

  • Give him a cold bath.

  • Take a rectal temperature every 10 minutes.

  • Continue with the bath until his temperature comes down to 103 degrees.

  • If his condition does not improve, get him to the vet as soon as possible.

Extreme Cold Exposure:

  • Frostbite and/or hypothermia can set in when exposed to cold temperatures.

  • Get him out of the cold weather and place in a warm, dry place.

  • Wrap your dog in a blanket to raise his body temperature.  Call your vet immediately.

Drowning

  • Remove dog from the water.

  • Have someone contact the veterinarian

  • Begin cpr immediately, keeping dog's nose and mouth lower than the chest

  • If his lungs are filled with water, follow the below procedures:

  • Lift dog, place head in the lowest position and keep rear feet high.

  • Squeeze dog's chest firmly until fluid stops draining.

  • Restart cpr.

Eye Injuries

With eye injuries, it is best to contact your veterinarian and follow his advice.

This site and its contents are intended to serve as basic informational purposes 
 --not a substitute for-- 
professional veterinary care!

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